How do people of faith get involved in the fight to improve our nation’s public schools? The Expectations Project (TEP) has partnered with the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) to share our expertise in education and faith-based advocacy. This has culminated in the gathering of resources to assist people of faith (clergy, leaders, pastors, lay members) to advocate to impact inequity issues in K-12 public education. 

Our goal is to encourage people of faith to become more involved in the movement to improve K-12 public schools. TEP believes that all young people can receive an amazing education, regardless of the zip code they live in, money their parents make, or the color of their skin. Here is why we think faith communities should be involved: There are more than 300,000 places of worship across America compared with roughly 23,000 high-poverty public schools, struggling to meet student needs—a ratio of 13 to 1.  We urge the faith community to address the vast inequities in public education and speak up and act on behalf of “the least of these.” (Matthew 25:40)

What is advocacy? It should address systemic problems with systemic solutions. Some persons may have advocacy experience while others may be new advocates. The problems facing our nation’s public schools are so vast that all of us are needed to make substantive impact. We created this chart so that you can better understand ways to get involved in this important work.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

About UNCF

UNCF is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness.

About The Expectations Project

We are faith leaders and advocates using our combined influence to demand a high-quality education for all God’s children, regardless of the zip code they live in, money their parents make, or the color of their skin. To learn more, visit www.expectations.org.

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